The concept of sustainability might be au current, but to think about what if the fabrications recycled have a chance to live in its own ecosystem, as if a terrarium for fashion. It’s a fascinating concept which has been applied to Rebecca Dovenryd Almberg clothing brand, Constance Studio. Named after the designer’s grandmother, the previous knitwear maestro behind Proenza Schouler and Jonathan Simkhai’s knits, launched the line in 2020 amidst the pandemic and social revolution. Though one would think that it would hinder the development of a new brand, these circumstances have been met with a great value in interpreting the way which the brands concept has been cultivated. From the touch of her fabrics, to the faint colors of faint lushness we got to know the Scandinavian designer who took on the spirit of Tinsel towns literary cool girl sister.  

You mentioned that the t shirts are silk and cashmere?

Yes, all of the pieces are cashmere and silk made in Italy the chunkier pieces are 100% lambswool also made in Italy, and are you familiar with the Constance Circle?

I looked it up briefly can you explain more, it’s a buyback program, right?

We are designing we are conscious of their materials the styles and how if we get it returned how can we recycle it. If you buy a piece, we allow you to return it in any condition and at any time in 10 years we will either put it in our Constance Circle collection, or we will recycle it. So the idea’s long-term goal is to be fully sustainable. Hopefully one day we can use all of our own recycled yarn. It will be years from now because right now we have to sell and then buy back. That is the idea and mission for the brand. There is just so much waste, because of the process. The system is just set up that way and it is hard to change the way you are already working. Now as a new brand you have the opportunity to just start.

Do you feel that fits in with this whole cottage core home I’m for lunch where concept as well, everything looks so comfortable?

It is one thing that I am trying to keep in mind during designing. You can wear it more casually or more dressed up and you can layer everything. The material is very nice to the skin. Everything can just be layered together.

Did you come up with these color combinations, it is very now. The turmeric orange, the taupe feeling, I feel like it is a very all across the board thing.

Thank you, I don’t even remember what the first inspiration was. I started to think about this a while back I was collaborating with this pastry chef who makes dessert installations. Her name is Amy Yip, her company is Yip Studios. She makes beautiful things. I picked the colors it went with both of our concepts. We had the inspiration of dried grapefruits and stones, more earthy tones. Another part of sustainability is some of the colors we did not have full control over because we were using limited run fabrics and worked with what we had. Which I kind of like working like that because you cannot plan everything do you have limitations. It’s another part of knitwear, you can’t do anything. With cut and sew you can just construct it however you want. Knitwear you need to calculate, “is it possible to achieve this shape?” It’s a challenge I really like.

The colors of great it’s like a neutral deliciousness, milk latte, grapefruit, cookie.

It’s been a journey. Another thing I wanted to mention is that this is our starting collection and moving forward we also like to keep in mind that its not seasonal. So this collection will be the one that will run over time. We will design into this collection and then we will restyle the pieces with a campaign shoot to give it new life, but try not to ever let the pieces go to sale or be put into a storage, because “Now it is out of season.” Hopefully we can make an organic transformation.

I think a lot of it has to do with reeducating the consumer. I’m a total fashion victim, but my wardrobe is split up between things that are quite extreme with other pieces I’ve had for over a decade. It’s training clients to realize that these are products that will last forever. Though that terminology tends to get so cliché. Like this is a perfect knitted tank to be worn at any age and forever.

Yes and I think, that we can buy so much, because of fast fashion, mass production, and all of that. It’s so available and we like having new things. Not needing those adds to the huge waste and environmental damage is done. It is the responsibility of the companies to educate or offer a change to the customer. It’s a lot to ask for the general public to just change their behavior and start spending more money.

The colors of great it’s like a neutral deliciousness, milk latte, grapefruit, cookie.

It’s been a journey. Another thing I wanted to mention is that this is our starting collection and moving forward we also like to keep in mind that its not seasonal. So this collection will be the one that will run over time. We will design into this collection and then we will restyle the pieces with a campaign shoot to give it new life, but try not to ever let the pieces go to sale or be put into a storage, because “Now it is out of season.” Hopefully we can make an organic transformation.

I think a lot of it has to do with reeducating the consumer. I’m a total fashion victim, but my wardrobe is split up between things that are quite extreme with other pieces I’ve had for over a decade. It’s training clients to realize that these are products that will last forever. Though that terminology tends to get so cliché. Like this is a perfect knitted tank to be worn at any age and forever.

Yes and I think, that we can buy so much, because of fast fashion, mass production, and all of that. It’s so available and we like having new things. Not needing those adds to the huge waste and environmental damage is done. It is the responsibility of the companies to educate or offer a change to the customer. It’s a lot to ask for the general public to just change their behavior and start spending more money.

You started the line in the midst of the quarantine and protest how to do you see the company aligning with that.

We were actually supposed to start and launch our company in March when the first lockdown happened and we had to cancel everything. I almost gave up I was so tired. We ended up launching May 29, the day before the protest fully broke out here in LA. It was really tough, everything went really silent, which is great no one at our launch posted anything we didn’t post anything.

It was a moment of solidarity for everyone. It’s almost like your work has shown its concept through this time.

Going forward it is part of our history especially with Covid, being a slow fashion brand has been a good thing for Constance. For us especially with the protest I felt like if I could build my community, I have the opportunity to speak through that. It was an eye-opener for a lot of people. For sure it is shaping everything.  

Why did you decide to settle in LA?

I moved to San Francisco from Sweden. I studied there and graduated from fashion school and then I moved to New York for work. Then when I started working with Jonathan Simkhai they moved their entire company out to LA. Coming  back here to California, I just love it here! I feel like there are so many opportunities here and the interest fashion. And it’s still an emerging market.

It’s not a secret but there is a specific girl who lives in LA and appreciates and understands this, a very genuine appreciation for quality and perfected wardrobe. It’s very much in the spirit of a very literary tradition.  

Yes, for sure! I love New York, it would be amazing to be there and launch a brand but it’s oversaturated and you would kind of blend in. I think being in LA is helpful for the brand, and I just want to be here, so it’s better to just set the foundation here!

Which is your neighborhood?

Silverlake!  

Click here for more information and to shop Studio Constance

Photography — David William Baum

Model — Brooke Makenzi

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